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20131028
20131105
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] >>> tonight on c-span the house intelligence committee holds a hearing ons nsa surveillance program and later trayvon martin's mother testifying at the hearing on stand your ground laws. .. only those recognized to speak will be allowed to. >> and those who are not in compliance will be removed from the committee room. i would like to welcome our first panel today. the director of the national intelligence james clapper deputy attorney james cole national security or keith alexander the deputy director of the nsa chris ingalls. following the first panel we will move immediately into the second panel of nongovernment experts who are very knowledgeable on fisa and privacy issues. today's hearing will provide an open forum to discuss amendments to the surveillance act and possible changes to the way fisa applications are handled at the department of justice and the nsa. i hope that all of our witnesses will give clear answers about how the proposal is under consideration in congress would affect the nsa's ability to stop terrorist attacks before they occur and encourage members to answer questio
nsa programs that included spying on foreign leaders in a house intelligence hearing today. in the testimony, national intelligence director james clapper and nsa director keith alexander says data collected was provided to the nsa by other country's intelligence agencies. this hearing is chaired by michigan congressman mike rogers. [inaudible conversations] >> i'll only accept the decorum and only those recognized to speak. i'd like to welcome the first pam today, director of the national intelligence, james clapper, deputy attorney general james cole, national security agency director, keith alexander, deputy director of the nsa, chris england. following the first panel, moving immediately into the second panel of nongovernment experts who are very knowledgeable on fisa and privacy issues. today's hearing is an open forum to discuss potential amendments to the foreign intelligence surveillance act and possible changes to the way fisa applications are handled by the department of justice and the nsa. i hope that all of our witnesses will give clear answers about how propos
by the n.s.a. because a few numbers may solve an authorized investigation. supporters of bulk collection practices have defended this program as an important tool in the fight against terror. they have said that this is a mechanism to access the logs quickly and they are not actually listening to the content. president obama even said, and i'll quote, "when it comes to telephone calls, nobody is listening to your telephone call. instead, the government was just sifting through this so-called met aadata" madam president, the president is right. they are not listening to the actual calls like the f.b.i. conducting a wire tavment but let me outline that the government can figure out what is going on i from those call logs. for example, they will know that an american citizen in nevada received a call from the local n.r.a. office and then called their representative and senators. but they claim that the content of that call remains safe from government intrusion. or they'll also know that a nevadan from las vegas called a suicide prevention hotline and spoke to an individual for 12 minutes.
you about afghanistan. but i want to start with the dustup over the n.s.a. allegedr our, you know, espionage of friends and allies around the world. >> still alleged? pretty muchit is acknowledged. i tried to get an explicit acknowledgement out of the and they haven't gone that far. >> what was the apology for if haven't acknowledged it? anyway. about angelament merkel is that the united states is not and will not be in on her phone conversations. there was never any statement about the past tense. was always current, future. did you know this was going on? you got all of the security -- specifically. i think the most that i would have known would have been the would have been the intelligence assessments. saying specifically where they came from. in other words, it could be say, well, that the source of assessment would be high level officials, for instance, in a country. but you don't know that was one on one or transferred anonymously in conversation. whether it was overheard. the source is -- they don't describe in the reports that we get that so and so's phone was -- conversa
to have that level playing field if we're going to succeed. >> does, do the geopolitical tensions over nsa stuff, is that damaging to the prospects of a t-tip agreement? >> look, it is obviously a serious issue that is out there. our view is that these issues are to be kept on separate tracks, in the right lanes of dialogue between officials on both sides. you have heard from a number of europeans that they see the logic of moving ahead with t- tip. it is important to their growth strategy to tighter -- to try to maintain competitiveness. we are hopeful we will continue to make progress on that. we have teams in brussels. there are negotiations that had to be canceled during the shutdown of the government but are back on track. we expect to continue those discussions in the coming weeks. >> a number of people have mentioned regulatory alignment, in autos. can you give us more detail of what that means in practice? if you are bmw, what are the challenges of having different regulatory regimes on both sides of the atlantic? >> one is obvious the crash testing. cars have to be crash tested in
? intelligence officials assume we will over correct this. there will be a move to really constrain what the nsa and our andlligence agencies do talksf the 9/11 report about it. quite sure, it can go too far. -- >> sure. we are not anywhere near going to far. the pendulum can go to far. the whole nsa metadata issue is hard and fast. give you my views on it but nonetheless, i have not seen the pendulum swing too far yet. >> i have spoken to some officials, some off the record -- >> i don't think he's unstable. very friendly conversations, first of all. he's very direct, some of the about us ande said our people. i don't understand politics, by the way. why is he saying things that make it either on likely, less less likely,ikely, what's the politics? i don't get it. on the politician. forsee they say things public consumption -- i'm the politician. i know it's rare. once in a great while the politician will say something for the public that they don't exactly believe themselves or would say differently. why is he saying the things? the conversation i want to emphasize is that they are friendly, v
definition of self-defense. this is a tough time for nsa. everyone says, what are you doing and why are you doing it? when we get together, we actually say, it is much more important for this country that we defend this nation and take the beatings than it is to give up a program that would result in this nation being attacked. we would rather be here in front of you today and telling you why thenfended these programs having give them up and have our nation or our allies be attacked and have people killed. span,is weekend on c- intelligence officials defend the nsa intelligence program at a house hearing. saturday at 10 a.m. eastern. live funds on c-span 2, your phone calls and comments for kitty kelley. both tv's noon on "in-depth." in november,end remembering john f. kennedy. eyewitness events surrounding the assassination. sundays at 3 p.m. eastern. >> this painting was originally painted as my grandmother's .fficial white house portrait in the 1960s, lady bird johnson went looking for portraits of first ladies to bring hang in the white house. they thought it was important. she looked h
in the same time frame. watch sunday at 10:00 a.m. eastern here on c-span. >> this is a tough time for n.s.a. where everybody says what are you doing or why are you doing it? we actually say it is much more important for this country that we defend this nation and take the beatings than it is to give up a program that would result in this nation being attacked. we would rather be here in front of you today telling you why we defended these programs than having given them up and have our nation or our allies be attacked and people killed. >> this weekend on c-span, intelligence officials defend the n.s.a. surveillance program. this morning at 10 eastern. live sunday on c-span 2 your calls and comments for kitty kelley, best selling author of unauthorized buying fiss of jackie e, nancy reagan, the bush family. on c-span 3 remembering john f. kennedy. eyewitness accounts of his november 1963 asass pace in. last week, michigan senator carl levin traveled to afghanistan and met with president karzai. today, the senate armed services committee chairman talked about
about the drone attacks. the nsa revelations have undermined some confidence. now, there's a number of different reasons, but i think what i'm going to do is point out the reasons why i think we have not had as much success as we had hoped in terms of building broad support for our campaign and, second, what we ought to do about it. i think the reasons why are fairly clear. number one, as i mentioned, is the drone strikes. it has gotten a fair amount of attention. you know, the number of civilian casualties, the justification for those attacks. the world is focused on this. now, i do believe that drones are getting an unfair portion of the blame here. a drone is a weapon of war. i don't think the rest of the world would feel any better if we were launching cruise missiles from out in the ocean. i don't think that changes it. there's a little too much of an emphasis on how this has fundamentally changed things, that a drone is more dangerous than sending in a seal team on launching a bunch of cruise missiles. they're not the perfect instrument they are sometimes described to be, and
the last piece of week or two, u.s. surveillance practices. about 80% of the work agencies u.s.nsa is outside the and is not governed by statutes. it is governed partially by guidelines that you or your predecessors put in place. are you looking at whether those reduction provide any -- any protection for foreign nationals? can you give any assurances abroad that the government is not doing this willy-nilly? >> as the president has indicated and he is right, we are in the process of conducting a review of the surveillance activities to make sure we are striking a balance to keeping the american people safe and their allies safe. and also guarding the civil liberties and privacy of those same people. we are in conversations with our partners in new york and other parts of the world to make sure -- in europe and other parts of the world to make sure we strike that balance. we can do certain things is not necessarily mean we should do these things. i think that is the chief question that has to be resolved. it is almost a cost-benefit. what is the benefit we are receiving and what a
clapper and nsa direct or general keith allen discussed the nsa surveillance program and spying on foreign governments before the house intelligence committee hearing earlier this week. >> i never expected to write an entire book on cancer until i was diagnosed at a relatively young age. i was diagnosed at 36. i was astonished at how different i thought it was -- how different i was going through treatment than what i had heard about cancer and what i expected cancer be. and i sort of expected it -- i expected it to run like a well oiled machine in which cure wasn't obviously guaranteed, but people knew about my particular cancer at be followed and what i found was being really, really different. i couldn't help but i started to write about it. >> the head of the wrecks on trans next round of talks, george washington university hosted regional experts were monday. a farmer winning presidential candidate and former official at the american embassy in a rant to our commenting on prospects for the agreement. the impact of president rouhani election. nuclear weapons talks begin on november 7.
. >> congratulations, senator. welcome. [cheers and applause] [applause] >> this is a tough time for nsa where they said, what are you doing or why are you doing it? here's what we do. when we get together, we don't -- well, maybe a couple times we whine -- but we actually say it is much more important for this country that we defend the nation and take the beatings than it is to give up a program that would result in this nation being attackedded. we would rather be here in front of you today telling you why we defended these programs than having begin them up and have our nation or our allies be attacked and people killed. >> this weekend on c-span, intelligence officials defend the nsa's surveillance program on a house intelligence committee hearing. saturday morning at ten eastern. live sunday on c-span2, your calls and comments for kitty kelly, best selling author of unauthorized biographies, nancy reagan, the british royal family, the bush family, and others at noon on booktv's "in-depth," and on c-span3's american history tv, each weekend in november, remembering john f. kennedy, eyewit
on with the national security agency. mr. secretary, to start with you, because you jointly oversea the nsa and as a senior member of the national security committee, clearly, this is in your portfolio as well, so what did you know about collection of intelligence from world leaders communications whether it was data or whatever it was, what did you know about it? when did you know about it, and have you discussed it with the president and feel it appropriate? why is it appropriate? mr. minister, how worried is your government that the united states is intercepting communications, and what does this do to new zealand's trust with the u.s.. first, mr. secretary. >> barbara, i don't discuss conversations i have in national security counsel meetings. i certainly don't discuss publicly conversations that we have regarding intelligence. we are examining dynamics out there and procedures and processes, i think, the white house has been very clear on that; and i think those who lead intelligence community even very clear on that. we have great respect for our partners, allies who cooperate with us
- called nsa spying concerns. do you have an update, and do you think these meetings have improve relations between the u.s. and the eu? >> there's no question that the kind of communication we have had with the european allies have been very important and very useful when it comes to making clear how much we value the kind of security cooperation that our nations have and that we have with europe in general. comes toal when it keeping americans safe, when it comes to keeping our european allies safe. there are the tensions that of been caused by these disclosures are ones that we knowledge and ones that we are addressing directly in our communications with european nations and other nations who have been part of the disclosures. >> [indiscernible] >> i would not speak for any european nation or any other allied nation, but we believe the kind of medication that we have engaged in has been effective and useful in making we value those relationships, how important our cooperation is when it comes to national security issues and intelligence matters and how much more broad our relations veryb
-span, intelligence officials defend the nsa's surveillance program in a house committee. -- kelley,elly author of biographies. .nd american history tv remembering john f. kennedy. eyewitness accounts of the assassination. sunday at 3 p.m. eastern. >> president obama met with iraqi prime minister to talk about the partition between the u.s. and iraq. he addressed the syrian civil war and iran's nuclear program. this is about 20 minutes. >> all set? all set? i want to welcome back prime minister maliki to the white house. it's been two years since the last u.s. troops left from iraq, but the strategic partnership between our two countries remains very strong. we honor the lives that were lost, both american and iraqi, to bring about a functioning democracy in a country that previously had been ruled by a vicious dictator. and we appreciate prime minister maliki's commitment to honoring that sacrifice by ensuring a strong, prosperous, inclusive and democratic iraq. >> [speaker translates] >> we had a wide-ranging discussion about economic issues, regional issues, and security issues. [speaker tr
for nsa. everybody says what are you doing or why are you doing it? but here's what we do. when we get when we get together -- well maybe a couple of times we've wine, but we actually say it is much more important for this country that we defend this nation and take the beatings than it is to give up a program would result in a nation being attacked. we would rather be here in front of you today telling you why we defended these programs and having given them up and having the nation or the allies. they defended the program and the house intelligence committee meeting. saturday morning at ten eastern. blasÉ sunday at c-span2 your calls and comments >> asad nassa's future goes, so too does that of america. if nassa is healthy, then you don't need a program to convince people that science and engineering is good to do because you will see it at large on the paper. it will be called for engineers to help us go ice fishing where there is an ocean of water that has been liquid for billions of years. we will dig through the soil and look for life that will give me the best biologists. look
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)

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